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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

Remy Eichner is aware that life can feel limiting for people with severe hearing loss. So when she discovered a product that provided more freedom, she took hold of the opportunity.

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Remy Eichner, a junior at Park City High School, won third
place in the  Utah High School Entrepreneur Challenge
for her helmet that is compatible with cochlear implants.
(Photo courtesy of Remy Eichner) 

Note: Remy developed her helmet through the Park City CAPS program, which is supported by PCEF donors.

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

When the reading interventionists at McPolin Elementary School realized they did not have enough time to work with students, they added more hours to their day. They now arrive at the school at 7:30 a.m. to have one-on-one time with their students.

A team of five instructors launched a before- and after-school program at McPolin Elementary this school year. With the additional hours, the teachers are able to interact with students who are falling behind in their classes because they struggle with reading. The program is funded by the Park City School District, Park City Education Foundation and the Hall Family Fund.

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Amy Warren, left, works with student Ethan Alejo during the reading
intervention program at McPolin Elementary School.  The school
expanded the program this year to before and after school hours.
(Photo by Laura Todd) 

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

While searching for a female-only hack-a-thon to sign up for, Sela Serafin and Claire Oberg discovered that there were none available in Utah for high school students. So, they decided to create one themselves.

Serafin and Oberg, along with the rest of the Girls in Tech Club at Park City High School, plan to host the school's first female-only hack-a-thon, which is a contest to complete a given task using computer programming. The event is set to take place at the high school on April 27, and the club is currently raising funds for the event.

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Park City High School students in the Girls in Tech club have been planning
the school's first all-female hack-a-thon since November. The event
is set to take place on April 27. (Photo courtesy of Sela Serafin) 

Note: PCEF donors support the Girls in Tech club.

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

A program that started in the Park City School District less than a decade ago has since become an integral part of the district and a key talking point during master planning conversations.

The preschool program, which serves 3- and 4-year-olds within the district's boundaries, expanded quickly since it started at McPolin Elementary School eight years ago. The district intends to add a full-day class to the program next year, but it is running out of classroom space to maintain the growth.

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Laurie Jorgensen, right, reads to McPolin Elementary School preschooler
Fenna Alvareaz during class.  Preschool is popular among families in the 
distrcit, but the program does not have room to keep growing.
(Photo by Tanzi Propst/Park Record) 

 Note: PCEF donors support the Preschool program.

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

The Robominers, a robotics team from Park City High School, approached their final qualifier for the world championships a little disheartened. With a rough season behind them, they decided as a team to stop worrying about qualifying and instead try to enjoy what they believed would be their last competition together.

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Team members from Park City High School's robotics teams Checkmate, 
Inconceivable, and Robomiers show off their robots after a competition
earlier in the season.  Three teams qualified for the First Robotics World Championship.
(Photo courtsey of Laura Monty) 

 Note: PCEF donors support Robotics.

 

 

 

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Carolyn Webber Alder, Park Record

In a town obsessed with winter sports and other recreational activities, head injuries are almost unavoidable. A few months ago, students from Park City High School set out to discover just how common concussions are, as well as what the community knows about the injuries.

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Students in the Health Science and Sports Medicine track with PCCAPS performed 
projects with businesses in town.  One group of four students organized a survey
that gathered data about public knowledge of concussions. (Photo courtesy of Jared Romero)

 Note: PCEF donors support PCCAPS.

 

 

 

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